Be Ready

Rebecca

Building Brighter Futures

Rebecca, a photography enthusiast, dreamed of running a successful business from her own studio. At the age of 12, Rebeccas struggled to retain her school focus after the death of her mother. Understandably, her school work suffered and she left at the age of 15 with no qualifications and her career ambitions shattered. Today, 4 years later, she has become a Youth  Communications Champion on MYA’s Talent Match Programme; living proof that with the right support, young people can overcome the most challenging of circumstances.

Rebecca says “I know how competitive the job market can be and it is intimidating for anyone particularly when you are trying to get your future career. If Talent Match had been accessible for me I would have found it a massive support knowing that there was something out there that would assist me, despite my lack of qualifications and confidence”

For more information email talent.match@mya.org.uk

Be Healthy

Jack

Jack, 15, was referred to MYA’s counselling project, OKUK. Through Person Centered Counselling, Jack was helped to develop coping strategies to aid his recovery from bullying and alcohol issues, as well as support his confused feelings about his sexuality. Jack’s family life had suffered to the point where he became estranged from his father. He sought solace through alcohol which made him angry and even more confused. Several months later Jack’s life has become stable, he has re-engaged with his studies and his family and friends now communicate much more positively.

The combined efforts of MYA’s Counselling and Healthline projects  are positive proof that a synergised approach can overcome multiple dilemmas within young people’s lives.

Be Creative

Elizabeth

Elizabeth, 16, was referred to guitar lessons with the Noise project through 408, MYA’s advice and counselling service in south Sefton. She had dropped out of school after a bullying campaign on social media and had become increasingly isolated and withdrawn. She had developed a morbid fascination with the so-called 27 Club of musicians who had died aged 27, and had begun to self harm. Through consultation with her worried parents, project staff developed a personalised programme for Elizabeth that covered both musical tuition and impartial life advice.

For a number of sessions the guitar would sit untouched and no amount of encouragement would help. Staff simply listened to what Elizabeth had to say and encouraged her gently to put her feelings into lyrical form. This approach resonated very strongly with her and she soon began to pour out verse after verse. As a result of her work with MYA Elizabeth has re-engaged with learning and is now studying computer game design at college. She has found a new group of friends, built a social life and has not self harmed for some time now. She told us recently “I wanna be 28”.